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Clifford Chance

Brexit - Citizens' Rights, Dispute Resolution and the CJEU

Finding a means to resolve direct disputes between the UK and the EU after withdrawal should be easy. The difficult part is what ability companies and individuals should have to pursue their rights under the withdrawal agreement and the agreements forming the “deep and special partnership” between the UK and the EU. The UK Government appears to reject any recourse by companies and individuals to an international tribunal (including the Court of Justice of the European Union), while the EU appears to require it. If the UK Government’s view prevails, then individuals in the UK will find that the entitlement they have today to take direct action to protect their rights under EU treaties will not apply to their rights under any withdrawal agreement, unlike individuals in the EU.

Briefings

11 September 2017

Brexit - Citizens' Rights, Dispute Resolution and the CJEU

Finding a means to resolve direct disputes between the UK and the EU after withdrawal should be easy. The difficult part is what ability companies and individuals should have to pursue their rights under the withdrawal agreement and the agreements forming the “deep and special partnership” between the UK and the EU. The UK Government appears to reject any recourse by companies and individuals to an international tribunal (including the Court of Justice of the European Union), while the EU appears to require it. If the UK Government’s view prevails, then individuals in the UK will find that the entitlement they have today to take direct action to protect their rights under EU treaties will not apply to their rights under any withdrawal agreement, unlike individuals in the EU.

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