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Clifford Chance

Clifford Chance

Regulating the irregular

The pressure is on for regulators as well as businesses to grip the host of new and awkward issues tech-driven growth is raising.

Our research findings, in collaboration with Forbes Insights, show that a significant number of executives (particularly in the US) are looking for more, or clearer, regulation in this area. US executives are also most likely to say businesses should be more involved in shaping tech regulation.

In collaboration with Forbes Insights, we surveyed 300 senior c-suite executives from $1 billion+ companies on their hopes and fears for tech-driven growth. To find out more, read the Regulators: Enabling Progress and Getting Involved: The Role of Business in Regulation extracts from our Ready, Steady, Grow report below.

Regulators: enabling progress

Regulation is often associated with impeding and restricting activities, but it can also bring clarity and certainty.

Read more about Regulators: enabling progress in our Ready, Steady, Grow: Building a sustainable tech strategy for next decade report.

Getting involved: the role of business in regulation

When it comes to the role of business in technology regulation, executive opinions vary by region.

Read more about Getting involved: the role of business in regulation in our Ready, Steady Grow: Building a sustainable tech strategy for the next decade report.

Ready, Steady, Grow.

Building a sustainable tech strategy for the next decade

Ready, Steady, Grow.

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